The Orchestra on Tour

South America Tour - July 2019

The concerts will take place on 22-31 July 2019, in Peru, Colombia, Panama and Argentina

The Israel Philharmonic Orchestra will return in July to South America, for a special tour under the baton of Maestro Zubin Mehta. The upcoming tour will mark the IPO’s last performances in this continent with Maestro Mehta as Music Director.

The tour will take place on 22-31 July, featuring seven concerts in four cities: Lima (Peru), Bogota (Colombia), Panama City (Panama) and Buenos Aires (Argentina). Buenos Aires born Martha Argerich, one of the world’s most celebrated pianists, will appear with the orchestra in a concert in her hometown.

The orchestra will perform several programs on the tour.

The works include Beethoven’s Symphony no. 6 (“Pastoral”), Reinecke’s Flute Concerto with IPO Principal Flute Guy Eshed, Ravel’s La Valse, Haydn’s Sinfonia Concertante with IPO principal players: cellist Emanuele Silvestri, bassoonist Daniel Mazaki, oboist Christopher Bouwman and violinist David Radzynski, Mahler’s Symphony no. 1, Partos’ Concertino for Strings, Schubert’s Symphony no. 3, Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique, and Schumann’s Piano.

Program

Gran Teatro Nacional, Lima
Monday, 22.7.19 at 20:00

Zubin Mehta, conductor
Guy Eshed, flutist 

Beethoven: Pastoral Symphony
Reinecke: Flute Concerto
Ravel: La Valse

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Teatro Mayor Julio Mario Santo Domingo, Bogota
Wednesday, 24.7.19 at 20:00

Zubin Mehta, conductor
Christopher Bouwman, oboist
Daniel Mazaki, bassoonist
David Radzynski, violinist
Emanuele Silvestri, cellist 

Haydn: Sinfonia Concertante
Mahler: Symphony no.1

————————————————————-

Teatro Anayansi, Panama city
Thursday, 25.7.19 at 20:00

Zubin Mehta, conductor
Partos: Concertino for strings
Schubert: Symphony no. 3

Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique

 ————————————————————-

Teatro Colon, Buenos Aires
Saturday, 27.7.19 at 20:00

 Zubin Mehta, conductor
Martha Argerich, pianist

Partos: Concertino for Strings
Schumann: Piano Concerto
Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique

————————————————————-

Teatro Colon, Bueno Aires
Sunday, 28.7.19 at 17:00

Zubin Mehta, conductor

Partos: Concertino for Strings
Schubert: Symphony no.3
Beethoven: Pastoral Symphony
————————————————————-

Teatro Colon, Bueno Aires
Monday, 29.7.19 at 20:00

Zubin Mehta, conductor
Christopher Bouwman, oboist
Daniel Mazaki, bassoonist
David Radzynski, violinist
Emanuele Silvestri, cellist

Haydn: Sinfonia Concertante
Mahler: Symphony no.1
————————————————————-

Teatro Colon, Bueno Aires
Tuesday, 30.7.19 at 20:00

Zubin Mehta, conductor
Guy Eshed, flutist

 Beethoven: Pastoral Symphony
Reinecke: Flute Concerto
Ravel: La Valse
————————————————————-

2019 U.S. TOUR

From Heichal HaTarbut to New York: the IPO departs for the United States, for a six-concert tour over ten days conducted by Maestro Yoel Levi.

The IPO’s 2019 U.S. Tour will kick off with a Feb. 2 concert at the Tilles Center for the
Performing Arts in Brookville, NY, that will feature performances of Schubert’s “Symphony No.
3” and Bruckner’s “Symphony No. 7.”

On Feb. 3, the orchestra will perform at Carnegie Hall in New York, where the audience will
hear Partos’ “Concertino for Strings,” Beethoven’s “Romance No. 1” in G major, Op. 40,
Beethoven’s Romance No. 2” in F major, Op. 50, Kreisler’s “Liebesleid,” John Williams’
“Theme from ‘Schindler’s List,’” Kreisler’s “Liebesfreud” featuring violinist Itzhak Perlman,
and Tchaikovsky’s “Symphony No. 6.” Preceding the concert will be a special Benefit Brunch.
The IPO will then perform on Feb. 5 at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm
Beach, where the program will be Schubert’s “Symphony No. 3” and Bruckner’s “Symphony
No. 7.”

The following night, Feb. 6, the orchestra will perform at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the
Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County, where the program will feature Schubert’s “Symphony
No. 3” and Bruckner’s “Symphony No. 7.”

On Feb. 7, the IPO will perform at the Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall in Sarasota, FL, where
the program will be Partos’ “Concertino for Strings,” Schubert’s “Symphony No. 3” and
Tchaikovsky’s “Symphony No. 6.”

The orchestra will conclude its tour with a Feb. 9 concert at the University Musical Society of
the University of Michigan (Hill Auditorium) in Ann Arbor, MI, where it will perform Partos’
“Concertino for Strings,” Schubert’s “Symphony No. 3” and Tchaikovsky’s “Symphony No. 6.”

• Feb. 2 – Tilles Center for the Performing Arts (Brookville, NY)
• Feb. 3 – Carnegie Hall (New York City)
• Feb. 5 – Kravis Center for the Performing Arts (Palm Beach)
• Feb. 6 – Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County (Miami)
• Feb. 7 – Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall (Sarasota, FL)
• Feb. 9 – University Musical Society of the University of Michigan (Hill Auditorium) in

 

 

 

Program

 

New York

Saturday 2 February at  Tilles Center, Brookville
Yoel Levi, conductor

Schubert: Symphony no. 3
Bruckner: Symphony no. 7

 

Sunday 3 February at  Carnegie Hall

Yoel Levi, conductor
Itzhak Perlman, violinist 

Partos: Concertino for strings
Beethoven: Romance 1, op. 40
Beethoven: Romance 2, op. 50
John Williams: Theme from “Schindler’s List
Kreisler: Liebefreud
Tchaikovsky: Symphony no. 6                              :

 

 

Miami

Tuesday 5 February at Concert at Kravis Center, West Palm Beach


Yoel Levi,
conductor

Schubert: Symphony no. 3
Bruckner: Symphony no. 7

Wednesday 6 February at  Arsht Center, Miami

Yoel Levi, conductor

Schubert: Symphony no. 3
Bruckner: Symphony no. 7

 

 

Miami / Sarasota

Thursday 7 February at Van Wezel Hall, Sarasota

Yoel Levi, conductor

Partos: Concertino for Strings
Schubert: Symphony no. 3
Tchaikovsky: Symphony no. 6

 

Ann Arbor

Saturday 9 February at  Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor

Yoel Levi, conductor

Partos: Concertino for Strings
Schubert:
Symphony no. 3
Tchaikovsky:
Symphony no. 6



U.S and Canada Tour 2017

Zubin Mehta, conductor

Itzhak Perlman, violinist 

Pinchas Zukerman, violist

Yefim Bronfman, pianist

David Radzynski, violinist

Program

 

New York

Wednesday, 25 October – Carnegie Hall

 

Zubin Mehta, conductor

Itzhak Perlman, violinist 

Pinchas Zukerman, violist

 

Mozart: “Marriage of Figaro” Overture

Mozart: Symphony no. 36, “Linz”

Mozart: Sinfonia concertante

 

Toronto

Saturday, 28 October – Roy Thomson Hall

 

Zubin Mehta, conductor
David Radzynski, violinist

 

Poznansky: “Footnote”

Ravel: “Daphnis & Chloe”, Suite no. 2

Strauss: Ein Heldenleben

 

Los Angeles

Monday, 30 October – Walt Disney Concert Hall

 

Zubin Mehta, conductor

Yefim Bronfman, pianist

 

Poznansky: “Footnote”

Beethoven: Piano Concerto no. 3

Schubert: Symphony no. 9 in C Major “The Great”

 

San Francisco

Tuesday. 31 October-  Davies Symphony Hall

 

Zubin Mehta, conductor

 

Poznansky: “Footnote”

Mozart: Symphony no. 36, “Linz”

Schubert: Symphony no. 9 in C Major “The Great”

 

 

 Santa Barbara

 Wednesday, 1 November – Arlington Theater

 

Zubin Mehta, conductor

 

Poznansky: “Footnote”

Mozart: Symphony no. 36, “Linz”

Schubert: Symphony no. 9 in C Major “The Great”

 

Miami

Saturday, 4 November – Kravis Center | Dreyfoos Hall

 

Zubin Mehta, conductor

David Radzynski, violinist

Poznansky: “Footnote”

Ravel: “Daphnis & Chloe”, Suite no. 2

Strauss: Ein Heldenleben

 

Sunday, 5 November –  Kravis Center

 

Zubin Mehta, conductor

Poznansky: “Footnote”

Mozart: Symphony no. 36, “Linz”

Schubert: Symphony no. 9 in C Major “The Great”

 

New York

Tuesday, 7 November – Carnegie Hall

 

Zubin Mehta, conductor

Yefim Bronfman, pianist

David Radzynski, violinist

 

Poznansky: “Footnote”

Beethoven: Piano Concerto no. 3

Strauss: Ein Heldenleben

 

Wednesday, 8 November – Carnegie Hall

 

Zubin Mehta, conductor

Mihoko Fujimura, mezzo soprano

 MasterVoices Choir

Manhattan Girls Chorus

 

Mahler: Symphony no. 3

 

Thursday, 9 November – Carnegie Hall

Zubin Mehta, conductor

Gil Shaham, violinist

 

Weber: “Oberon” Overture

Tchaikovsky: Violin Concerto in D Major, op. 37

Schubert: Symphony no. 9 in C Major (“The Great”)

 

Updates from the Tour – Sivann Maayani

Mozart and the Magnificent Three


Frankly, it’s hard for me to find the right words or opening sentence for this post. We were privileged to take part in an experience of a lifetime in last night’s concert. Three musical giants took the stage: Maestros Zubin Mehta, Itzhak Perlman and Pinchas Zukerman. The two string players perform as naturally as they breathe; their control over the instrument is so absolute that they are free to express any thought or emotion they wish. The channel between them and the music is completely open—their hearts and voices are one.
Their partner and old friend Maestro Mehta was with them every step of the way, I felt, with each sound, and with his entire soul. I have seen the great maestro’s attitude toward soloists, including those he loved very much, like the wonderful pianist Maria João Pires who performed with us just last week. But I have never seen him look so lovingly at anyone playing alongside him as he did yesterday. These three have been close friends for fifty years, and Perlman even mentioned in an interview that he has never played Mozart’s Sinfonia concertante for violin, viola and orchestra with another violist.
The depth of the long-standing relationship between these three giants and us, the IPO, was clear—everyone was at home. There was also a strong feeling that this was, in a sense, a farewell concert, even if unofficially. The combination of Mehta as our Music Director, these two soloists, and the orchestra, there both to play and to witness this collaboration, probably won’t happen again…and they simply played so beautifully that the entire group was nearly in tears.
Yesterday’s New York audience applauded between movements. Sometimes this may interfere with the musicians’ concentration, but sometimes it is simply impossible to resist.
The three are heroes from my childhood…I remember Maestro Mehta carrying Maestro Perlman’s violin and bow as the latter came on stage with crutches, and Mehta handing the instrument to him after he sat down. And I remember Perlman playing Brahms Concerto, the audience applauding between movements. I was so excited that I said, “That’s something!” I was eight years old, and I remember a nearby listener glaring at me.
This week marks the 30th anniversary of the death of the great cellist Jacqueline du Pré, also a close friend of the three (and a childhood heroine of mine, too). I could not help but remember the documentary film of their performance of Schubert’s “Trout” Quintet, with Mehta on the double bass and Daniel Barenboim on the piano. They were in their twenties, and in the film one sees the lighter side of their personalities, exchanging musical instruments and having a lot of fun just before going on stage. Such joy of life and a celebration of friendship and music.

 


The combination of events almost gave me goose bumps…only two weeks ago I played the “Trout” Quintet with orchestra members Lotem Beider Ben Aharon, Emanuele Silvestri and Uri Arbel and pianist Maria João Pires, at the opening concert of our new chamber music venue, Zucker Hall. This was also a one-time event, and I thought a lot about the documentary I mentioned above, especially as Maestro Mehta listened to us from the audience. Twenty years ago when I saw the film, I could not, in my wildest dreams, have imagined such a concert.
Yesterday, I also had philosophical thoughts on my mind. I reflected on where the personal statement of the composer ends and that of the performer begins, and where the parallel points exist. The giants Perlman and Zukerman are artists of clear, graceful and moving character; they are incredibly different from one another, so it is impossible not to be impressed by the fact that they play as if they are one person. Both are so captivating in their playing, that even if their style in Mozart’s music does not match what is considered “authentic” today, it is undeniable that Mozart’s work shines in all its splendor.

I did not imagine I would post so quickly—yesterday was the first concert of the tour, and we’ve only just arrived at our next stop, Toronto. But yesterday I felt a sense of timelessness. Even the great city of New York that pulsated outside Carnegie Hall, not knowing what was happening inside, retreated into the background. The combination of Mozart’s wonderful music, the close friendships, the closeness to the orchestra, it is simply impossible to describe what this meant for all of us. Although this post is only from my point of view, I have no doubts that these words will resonate in the hearts of the other members of the orchestra who played last evening.
As I wrote in my first posts two years ago, we are a bunch of lucky people.

 

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