Daniil Trifonov Plays the “Emperor”, Sascha Goetzel, conductor

דניל טריפונוב

Date

30.5.2019

Thursday 22:00

Hall

The Lowy concert hall

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Hall

The Lowy concert hall

Artists

Sascha Goetzel, conductor 

Daniil Trifonov, pianist 

Ran Danker, presenter 

Concert Program

Beethoven: Piano Concerto no. 5 (“Emperor”)
Mendelssohn: Fingal’s Cave Overture

Event Info

Virtuoso pianist Daniil Trifonov joins Austrian conductor Sascha Goetzel, who takes the stage with the IPO for the first time.

For every masterpiece, stories and anecdotes inevitably develop over the years. The credibility of some is questionable, but in certain cases there is likely a grain of truth. One such story explains how the nickname "The Emperor" became linked to Beethoven's Concerto No. 5: a soldier from the occupation army (a Frenchman in Vienna) who attended the premiere of the piece shouted "long live the emperor." It may have been the festive atmosphere, or the militaristic rhythms in the first movement that reminded him of marching music. The subject of "military rhythms" in Beethoven's music has engaged researchers and music lovers alike.

Musicologist Alfred Einstein, who wrote extensively on how military rhythms appeared in 4/4 time in Beethoven's compositions, especially in his concerti, discovered that this idea was borrowed from the works of Giovanni Battista Violti, an Italian composer who lived in France.

Looking at the work from this angle reveals an interesting process in which these "military themes” develop. For example, the second theme in the first movement is heard in the horns, among others, that play "military intervals," but lyrically (sensitive hunters?). Is this a concerto about "softening" the generals? (Things written before the elections.) And the dotted rhythm? It softens throughout the movement.

But even without speculation and extra-musical thought, this concerto is groundbreaking in a number of respects. In terms of form, it’s notable that not only is there no pause between the second and third movements, but the subject that starts the third movement is first presented slowly and lyrically at the end of the second movement. In this way, the work is divided into two parts within the three-part structure: the first movement (which is almost a work on its own in terms of dimensions and empowerment) and then the second and third movements together. Another point--attributed to the fact that the fifth concerto is the only concerto Beethoven could not perform himself due to his deafness, and the performance of the premiere was entrusted to his close pupil, Carl Czerny--is the absence of an improvised cadenza at the end of the first and third movements. (Beethoven even writes in detail not to improvise the cadenza where it is written out.)

Other peculiarities of this work include the high technical difficulty it poses to its performers--it requires immense skill, and the fact that the harmonies in the third movement (the rondo) expand into keys that would not have been typical during the time of the work’s composition.

In any case, the power, softness, virtuosity, orchestration, the beautiful melody of the second movement and the great interest that has been preserved make it one of the most popular works throughout history, by performers, conductors and music lovers.

In 1829 (before his big tour of Italy), Mendelssohn went on a tour of the British Isles, during which he spent two days sailing (with severe seasickness) between the Inner Hebrides, where he saw Fingal’s Cave on the island of Staffa off the coast of Scotland. Mendelssohn was deeply influenced by the landscape, which inspired him immediately. He wrote a letter to his sister Fanny which included the 20 opening bars of the work, noting: "In order for you to understand how the wonderful Hebrides have affected me, I send you the attached, which came to my mind while I was there."

The work is written as an orchestral overture that stands on its own right, describing the feeling of the ocean waves around the cave, and the changes in the atmosphere reflect the unexpected nature of the sea.

The work was completed in December 1830 and was originally called "To the Lonely Island." Later, he made changes to it, completed in June 1832, and changed its name to "The Hebrides" However, the title "Fingal’s Cave" was also used: on the title pages with the orchestration listing, Mendelssohn wrote "The Hebrides," but the on score itself he used "Fingal's Cave," a moniker that is still in use today.

 

 

Price Range

150 - 420 nis

Duration

approx 1.5 hours without intermission

Duration

approx 1.5 hours without intermission

Price range

150 - 420 nis

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