Inon Barnaran Plays Rachmaninov no.2, Alan Gilbert conducting

אלן גילברט

Date

17.2.2019

Sunday 20:00

Hall

The Lowy concert hall

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Hall

The Lowy concert hall

Artists

Alan Gilbert, conductor 

Inon Barnatan, pianist 

Anastasia Klevan, soprano 

Oded Reich, baritone 

Concert Program

Anders Hillborg: Exquisite Corpse
Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto no. 2
Nielsen: Symphony no. 3 (“Sinfonia espansiva”)

Event Info

The name Alan Gilbert (born 1967) became recognizable almost overnight after he was appointed Music Director of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra in 2009, an appointment that was not the obvious one. He was the first New York native to be appointed to this position. Born in New York, he lived near Lincoln Center and spent countless hours there—and not only because his two parents were violinists in the orchestra. Gilbert brought a new spirit to the orchestra by programming and commissioning contemporary works, creating new Artist-in-Residence and Composer-in-Residence roles for the orchestra, emphasizing educational and community work, and understanding that this orchestra should renew and influence musical life in New York, the United States, and around the world. When Gilbert finished his term as Music Director in 2017, there was no doubt he had significantly changed the face of the New York Philharmonic.

The program he brings to his concert series with the Israeli Philharmonic Orchestra demonstrates how Gilbert combines well-known works (such as those by Weber, Rachmaninoff, and Dvořák) with lesser-known works (as in Nielsen's Third Symphony) and new works (such as Exquisite Corpse by Swedish composer Anders Hillborg).

The Israeli pianist Inon Barnatan is already a regular guest in the most important venues around the world. He has performed as a soloist with the Cleveland Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Gewandhaus in Leipzig, and the Philharmonic orchestras in London and Helsinki. Born in Tel Aviv in 1979, he first studied with Victor Derevianko and continued his studies at the Royal Academy in London. Like Alan Gilbert, Barnatan is also considered a musician with his feet firmly planted in both the contemporary and classical worlds. Gramophone called him “a born Schubertian," but he also performs a great deal of contemporary music by composers such as Sebastian Currier, Avner Dorman, and Matthias Pintscher.

Bernstein rediscovered the music of Carl Nielsen, and the "Exquisite Corpse" by Anders Hillborg (born 1954)—an important Swedish composer of today—was dedicated to Alan Gilbert, who gave the premiere performance in 2002. The composer describes the work as "accessible and representative of my compositional world." The intriguing name came out of a social game that was common in the 1920s, where one of the participants had to create a sentence (each participant gave a word during his turn) without any of them knowing what the other wrote. In one of the cases, the sentence created was "the exquisite corpse drank the young wine"... Hillborg writes that for the surrealists of the early 20th century such a game could reveal "streams of consciousness" and flood the possible beauty of chance and "irrational connections." For him, there is an opportunity to "invite to the game" composers such as Ligeti, Sibelius, and Stravinsky. The success of Hillborg and the fact that he has been composing concert, electronic, choral and music for film and television has long intrigued him to know his work.

 

It seems everything has already been written about Rachmaninoff's piano concertos. And if there was a music lover who was not exposed to them before piano competitions became an important component of the culture of classical music consumption, in recent years it seems that not a year goes by when dozens of performances are not added to these works. Perhaps the reason for this is that the pianist's writing is that of a star pianist as well as an excellent composer: his music is idiomatic and precise, the solo textures fit the performer’s ten fingers "like a glove," and the emotional range of the work is all that a performer can ask. "This is a great gift to the history of piano literature from an excellent pianist who is also a great composer" said Arthur Rubinstein at the time. One of the less obvious aspects of Rachmaninoff's biography was his tendency towards profound sadness (or grief, or even depression, depending on the period and perspective). In this light we can understand the dedication of the work to Nikolai Dahl, who was a physician and hypnotist who restored the composer’s faith and self-confidence after his first concerto and symphony failed miserably in their debut performances. It seems Dahl did an excellent job because the second piano concerto marked the beginning of the indisputable success of Rachmaninoff's 28-year-long career. Biographers also note that shortly after the success of the concerto, Rachmaninoff married the love of his life, Natalya Satina.

The conductor and composer Leonard Bernstein had a special sense for great works by composers who were not necessarily widely recognized. Let us not forget that it was Bernstein who brought to the public consciousness the symphonies of Mahler, Shostakovich, Prokofiev, and Ives. In 1962, Bernstein "discovered" a “new” composer—at least to the wider world—the important Danish composer Karl Nielsen. The recording of Nielsen's Fifth Symphony by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra for CBS Records led many music fans to ask, "how have we not heard of this composer before?" When Bernstein recorded the Third Symphony of Nielsen (in 1965), the world already understood that before us were both an important composer and a wonderful piece. Today there seems to be no dispute about the importance, quality, and musical value of Nielsen's works.

Price Range

180-550 nis

Duration

approx 2 hours including intermission

Duration

approx 2 hours including intermission

Price range

180-550 nis

Follow us