Iván Fischer and Daniil Trifonov

איבן פישר

Date

27.3.2018

Tuesday 20:00

Hall

Auditorium

Venue

Rappaport Hall, Haifa

Venue

Rappaport Hall, Haifa

Hall

Auditorium

Artists

Iván Fischer, conductor 

Daniil Trifonov, pianist 

Concert Program

Haim Permont: Farewell Fanfare

Schumann: Piano Concerto

Mahler: Symphony no. 1

Event Info

Haim Permont’s Farewell Fanfare was written as a tribute to a music director who finished his term. The placement of the piece at the beginning of the concert makes for an unusual start for both the orchestra and the audience. The work presents a mirror image of the last movement of Haydn's “Farewell” Symphony. In the Haydn, the orchestra members leave the stage one by one as the end of the work approaches. In the Permont, the piece opens with an empty stage that fills up slowly: first one hears the sound of the trumpets, followed by the trombones, horns, drums, and ultimately, the rest of the orchestra. The music slows and ends with a single sound.

Schumann wrote in 1839: "We must wait for a composer to show us a new and brilliant way of combining the piano sound with the orchestral sound, and for the pianist to display his art on the keyboard in a way that blends with the orchestra, which no longer looks on from outside but fits into the scene." He achieved this in his Piano Concerto in A Minor. Schumann, who had planned a concerto as a gift in honor of his marriage to Clara in 1840, lingered with his writing, and the work took five years to complete. Given the circumstances surrounding its composition, the perfection of this work is surprising. The concerto is so complete, in a way, that musicologists have labeled the work as both a "concerto without piano" (Liszt) and a "concerto for piano solo with accompanying orchestra." In any case, the brilliance of Daniil Trifonov, a favorite of Israeli audiences, will shine through.

Mahler's Symphony No. 1 is the composer’s first orchestral expression of his many questions about the meaning of life, about which he also articulated. The point of departure is: “I am a native of Bohemia who lives in Austria, an Austrian among Germans, and a Jew in the world. I am an unwelcome guest wherever I am, not desired anywhere." And he wondered: "Where did we come from? Where does the road lead us? Did I want this life before I was created? How am I free if my character and image is in prison? How can I understand that the wickedness and cruelty of humans are the fruits of a good and gracious God? Will death eventually give life meaning?” These ideas are assembled and expressed musically with the thought that the symphony is an all-encompassing world. One can hear sounds from nature and echoes of Austrian, French and Jewish folk music—but with a wink. A multi-lingual piece of music, if you will. And importantly, Mahler's first symphony is one of the works most closely identified with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra.

Price Range

130 - 430 nis

Duration

approx 120 minutes including intermission

Duration

approx 120 minutes including intermission

Price range

130 - 430 nis

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