Joshua Bell Plays Dvořák

ג'ושוע בל

Date

25.6.2019

Tuesday 20:00

Hall

Auditorium

Venue

Rappaport Hall, Haifa

Venue

Rappaport Hall, Haifa

Hall

Auditorium

Artists

Gianandrea Noseda, conductor 

Joshua Bell, violinist 

Concert Program

Dvorak: Violin Concerto
Beethoven: Symphony no. 3, op. 55 (“Eroica”)

Event Info

Violinist Joshua Bell performs Concerto No. 3 by Saint-Saëns and Dvořák Concerto, under Maestro Gianandrea Noseda.
Dvořák: Violin Concerto
If Antonin Dvořák had been more obedient and had followed his parents' path, the world might have gained the "Dvořák sausages" or "Dvořák delicacies. The Czech family of butchers may have lost an heir, but the music world gained a gifted composer. Either way, Dvořák was responsible enough not to rely on composition alone, especially in the early stages of his life. He studied violin, and later viola, and led the viola section of the Prague National Theater Orchestra. As did many composers, he participated in competitions with monetary prizes and won four consecutive Austrian Music Award prizes. The judging panel included Eduard Hanslick, an important music critic of the time, and Johannes Brahms. It was Brahms who was enthusiastic about Dvořák's music and introduced him to the violinist Joseph Joachim, who encouraged Dvořák to write a violin concerto for him. Dvořák began to write the concerto in 1879, and sent the famous violinist the manuscript, which was returned to him with a fair amount of comments and suggestions for changes. (He noted that Dvořák certainly knew how to write for the violin, but that there were more idiomatic ways to express the composer's intentions.) Dvořák vigorously went to work on revisions and in May 1880 informed his publisher that the work had been completed. Another set of remarks found its way to the final version of the piece, and Joachim organized a reading rehearsal of the concerto in Berlin in November 1882. However, Joachim never performed the concerto in public.

 

Among the lesser-known violin concertos, Dvořák's Concerto in A Minor is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful and special--rich in vast melodies, equipped with a lyrical second movement and a finale in a Czech character. It is hard to understand why the concerto did not gain popularity comparable to his cello concerto (although this concerto is heard more than the almost-never-performed piano concerto).

 

Beethoven: Symphony No. 3 ("Eroica")

Difficult is the life of a modern composer! "I'm willing to pay money for this nightmare to end," one listener shouted at the premiere of the new piece; "Why did this composer have to make such an effort to be original?" a critic noted; "It's hard to believe that even great music lovers can handle such a long work," wrote another critic. The year is 1804, the composer being attacked is Ludwig van Beethoven, and the event is the Third Symphony, "Eroica." Whether a work by Stravinsky, Schoenberg or Beethoven, changes in style and form have always been controversial, but to our delight, history proves wiser and more tolerant.

 

But one can also understand those who opposed this symphony: it is fundamentally different from other symphonies written by Haydn, Mozart and even Beethoven himself. In many ways it portrays the structural boldness and breakthrough musical thought that has since become Beethoven’s trademark. An extremely long symphony (about 50 minutes), the first movement includes no less than six different subjects (the sequence in which they are presented is further testimony to the genius of the composer). The mourning in the second movement is also unusual, not to mention the groundbreaking fourth movement, which is composed of variations and themes. But for those who performed the premiere, all these innovations were strange, unusual and incomprehensible. The truth must be said: here and there the critics understood that "great moments are not missing in the symphony, which prove the energies and the talent of the composer, but eventually the feeling was that it would be better for Beethoven to return to the symphonic style of his earlier works, such as his septet in E-flat or the quintet in C that had attracted the audience's attention in the past." We all benefitted - Beethoven did not listen to this advice.

Price Range

130 - 430 nis

Duration

approx 1.5 hours including intermission

Duration

approx 1.5 hours including intermission

Price range

130 - 430 nis

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