Joshua Bell Plays Saint-Saëns

ג'ושוע בל

Date

23.6.2019

Sunday 20:00

Hall

The Lowy concert hall

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Hall

The Lowy concert hall

Artists

Gianandrea Noseda, conductor 

Joshua Bell, violinist 

Concert Program

Weber: Der Freischütz Overture
Saint-Saëns: Violin Concerto no. 3
Respighi: Pines of Rome
Respighi: Fountains of Rome

Event Info

Violinist Joshua Bell performs Concerto No. 3 by Saint-Saëns and Dvořák Concerto, under Maestro Gianandrea Noseda.

 Weber: The Overture to Der Freischütz

"Overture," almost like an "suit for an orphan," comes in all kinds and sizes. An opera overture is one of the most open and varied forms of music literature. There are composers who set a more rigid form for their overture (such as Mozart, whose overture to "The Marriage of Figaro" fits almost exactly the form of a sonata) and other composers who used the opening to the opera to present an "appetizer" of the great piece itself.

Weber's "Der Freischütz" includes a series of tunes from the opera itself. It is likely that more people are familiar with this overture in different arrangements and durations than those who have listened to the entire work. There is no doubt that the overture clearly reveals the "German" character of the work. The folk music style places Weber and "Der Freischütz" in the historical line of German operas, such as those that began with Louis Spohr and culminated in the work of Richard Wagner.

Saint-Saëns: Violin Concerto No. 3

Camille Saint-Saëns was born in Paris in 1835 and died in December 1921. He composed his Third Concerto for violin and orchestra in early 1880 and dedicated it to his friend violinist and virtuoso composer Pablo de Sarasate, who performed the premiere in Hamburg in October 1880. As in other violin concertos, the violinist for which the work was written greatly influenced the final result. At this stage of his life Saint-Saëns was a skilled composer, a skilled organist, a successful and esteemed teacher, a gifted writer of texts, a curious traveler, a man deeply engaged in philosophy, and was in the midst of a productive period during the time of writing this concerto. The works of Saint-Saëns demonstrate great orchestral skill, a clear sense of form and style (somewhat conservative), accessible melodic flashes and a sophisticated, though not groundbreaking, harmonic language (Saint-Saëns sounds as if the upheavals of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries did not influence his style). Of the six works composed by Saint-Saëns for violin and orchestra, three are in the form of concerto (he also wrote Rondo Capriccioso, Romance in C Major, and a Concertante from 1880). The first and third concerti became part of the repertoire used by violinists around the world. As in the case of violin concertos (Dvořák, Brahms), the composer had no "problem" to consult with the designated violinist regarding technical matters relating to writing for the instrument, resulting in a violinistic concerto (notice the beautiful overtone line that finishes the second movement), and the popularity of the work among audiences in Europe and the United States (premiere in 1890 in Boston) was immediate.

Respighi: Pines of Rome

Before instagram, art in general and music in particular was a legitimate way to share subjective impressions of the artist, of his views, and sites he experienced. In the case of Pines of Rome, composer Ottorino Respighi chose to describe pines blossoming in four sites in Rome at different times of the day. The work was completed in 1924 and was performed that year under the direction of Bernardino Molinari (the mythological orchestrator of "Hatikvah"). In 1924, the music world dealt not only with issues of content, but also with issues of form. The place of large symphonic works was replaced by shorter works (Webern’s Five Pieces were already 11 years old, as was the Rite of Spring). Creative freedom was almost infinite, and a certain amount of daring and originality was required to return to the concept of the sound poem. This is not an epic work (from the school of Liszt or Strauss), but one that places at its center the description of nature, the description of light, the description of the city in which pine trees grow. You can say that Respighi did not idealize nature, unlike Beethoven he looks at it almost "objectively" - ​​a talented composer looking at pines. What an original idea (though not new) and this creative freedom, in form and content, allowed the composer to write a liberated work, full of colors and perfectly orchestrated. The pines where kids play in the first movement; pines next to graves in the second movement; pines on top of the mountain next to the temple of Janus, discovered by moonlight; and pines where the ground they are planted in trembles while the unit of soldiers marching in is the modern version of the changing seasons of Vivaldi or Beethoven’s concept of wild nature. The fact that Respighi's nature is framed within the boundaries of a modern urban city like Rome can provide a key to understanding the stylistic complexity of the work. There is no doubt that Respighi succeeds with this work in bringing an up-to-date, contemporary and fascinating version of nature in music.

Respighi: Fountains of Rome

Of the four works of Respighi anchored in Rome and its landscapes, the "Fountains of Rome" achieved the greatest success. Perhaps because it is a spectacular display of orchestral tones (a lesser-known detail in the biography of Respighi, who, like Dvořák before him, and Ödön Pártos after him, was a viola player before turning to composition. He began his career as a violist in Russia, and there had the opportunity to study with Korsakov, whose orchestral fingerprints can be found in the work). Perhaps it was due to the fact that Arturo Toscanini took it upon himself to premiere the work, which he later performed also in the United States, perhaps it was the "Italian" statement that appealed to the music lovers in the country of the boot, and perhaps the fact that the work is accessible, magical and interesting. Each of the four movements of the work presents a mood in the eyes of the composer identified with one of the Roman fountains. The spectrum of feelings expressed in a vast work: solemnity, gaiety, nostalgia, peace. It is interesting to listen to it with "non-programmatic" ears, and those who do so will likely find a balanced and varied multi-movement work that presents the immense beauty of the orchestra's huge instruments.

Price Range

180-550 nis

Duration

approx 2 hours including intermission

Duration

approx 2 hours including intermission

Price range

180-550 nis

Follow us