Yoel Levi, conductor & Tom Borrow, pianist

יואל לוי

Date

11.1.2019

Friday 11:00

Hall

The Lowy concert hall

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Hall

The Lowy concert hall

Artists

Yoel Levi, conductor 

Tom Borrow, pianist 

Oren Nahari, presenter 

Concert Program

Ravel: Piano Concerto in G major
Schubert
: Symphony no. 3

Event Info

We regret to inform you that due to health reasons, Maestro Zubin Mehta and pianist Khatia Buniatishvili have been forced to cancel their appearances with the IPO.  Conductor Yoel Levi has kindly agreed to replace Maestro Mehta and young pianist Tom Borrow, a protégé of Murray Perahia, will play Ravel’s Concerto in G. major.

During his lifetime, Schubert was not considered an important symphonic composer. History has also been somewhat cruel to his symphonies, and except for the "Unfinished," they were forgotten for a long time. His Symphony No. 3, for example, was only performed in a public concert for the first time 53 years after the composer's death, and it made its way very slowly to the edge of the recorded repertoire. An ad in the Maariv newspaper from 1971 says, for example, that the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra chose to include the work in a youth concert(!). We assume that some of our longtime subscribers still remember this concert years later, or perhaps they remember the performance of this symphony with the English Chamber Orchestra, which was conducted in Caesarea in the same year by Daniel Barenboim.

The case of this symphony raises an interesting question: Is the fact that a composer like Schubert was an extraordinary genius in one genre (Art Song), a wonderful chamber-music composer, take away from the good—but not breakthrough—works he wrote in other genres? I think it would be right to put this symphony through a new audience "trial.” It’s worth mentioning that it was composed in 1815 (at about the same time that Beethoven wrote his Seventh Symphony), although it is written in a style that is more Mozartian than it is of Beethoven's innovative symphonic approach. Still, one can easily discover in it the charming qualities of Schubertian melodies, his ability to develop themes within the symphonic structures, and his interesting decision to avoid the slow second movement. (Schubert began to write an “Adagio” movement but chose to omit it in favor of a sequence of flowing, joyful symphonic movements.)

Price Range

170-490 nis

Duration

approx 2 hours

Duration

approx 2 hours

Price range

170-490 nis

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