Khatia Buniatishvili Plays Mozart

זובין מהטה

Date

17.1.2019

Thursday 22:00

Hall

The Lowy concert hall

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Hall

The Lowy concert hall

Artists

Zubin Mehta, conductor 

Khatia Buniatishvili, pianist 

Kobi Meidan ,presenter

Concert Program

Mozart: Piano Concerto no. 20 in D minor, K. 466
Ellington /Tchaikovsky: Nutcracker Suite

Event Info

It seems everything has already been written about Mozart's Piano Concerto in D Minor. But it may be worth noting that the opening of the work took place in the Mehlgrube Casino in Vienna with the composer as soloist. It is one of only two concertos that Mozart wrote in a minor key (the second is the C Minor Concerto, K.491), and as a young pianist, Ludwig Van Beethoven included it in his repertoire, writing his own cadenzas for the first and second movements of the work in 1809.

It is an open and well-known secret that musicians and composers have long had a great interest in the art of jazz. On May 21, 1893, an article by Antonín Dvořák appeared in the New York Herald, in which he wrote "I am now satisfied that the future of music in this country [America] must be founded upon what are called the negro melodies. This must be the real foundation of any serious and original school of composition to be developed in the United States…" (This and the following quotations come from Alex Ross's book "The Rest Is Noise.") In 1916, the Swiss conductor Ernest Ansermet wrote enthusiastically to his friend Igor Stravinsky about the "unheard-of music" he encountered during his visit to America. It was not enough for him to simply describe what he heard; he brought his friend recordings and sheet music of Jelly Roll Morton, which Stravinsky later said influenced the writing of his L'Histoire du soldat (The Soldier's Tale). In early 1923, the French Jewish composer Darius Milhaud came to the Capitol Palace in Harlem and wrote with amazement: "Against the beat of the drums the melodic lines crisscrossed in a breathless pattern of broken and twisted rhythms.” In 1926, the American critic Carl Van Vechten wrote that black artists were in possession of “a primitive birthright…that all civilized races were struggling to get back to—this fact explained the art of a Picasso or a Stravinsky.”

The perspective of jazz musicians regarding the infiltration of jazz into classical music was more hesitant. Duke Ellington rejected that a white man could be the composer of a “negro opera,” referring to Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess. Duke Ellington wrote in the early 1930s: "to attempt to elevate the status of the jazz musician by forcing the level of his best work into comparisons with classical music is to deny him his rightful share of originality.” But when Columbia Records invited Duke Ellington in 1960 to create a record with no stylistic constraints, Ellington responded to his friend Billy Strayhorn's proposal to write his own version of Tchaikovsky's “The Nutcracker.” The result was a melting pot of musical styles, music that met Tchaikovsky's themes and melodies with jazz rhythms, orchestration that featured brass instruments, complex harmonies, and the evocation of a dance hall in a large American city. It is not clear whether the Ellingtonian wink included a hidden satire of the original work, but Ellington turned the Sugar Plum Fairy from the Russian ballet into an alcoholic cherry. The Waltz of the Flowers became sensual and biting, and the American jazz spirit rests on the melodies that Tchaikovsky wrote for the choreographer Marius Petipa in St. Petersburg.

The Israel Philharmonic Orchestra plays Tchaikovsky's work alongside and Ellington and Strayhorn's Suite. And as it performs the 1960 jazz version with the original Russian work from 1892 for the Israeli audience, Walt Disney Studios prepares for the upcoming distribution of the 2018 version of the Nutcracker and the Four Realms. Coming soon to a cinema near you.

Price Range

150 - 420 nis

Duration

approx 1.5 hours without intermission

Duration

approx 1.5 hours without intermission

Price range

150 - 420 nis

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