Khatia Buniatishvili Plays Mozart

חטיה בוניטיאשוילי

Date

14.1.2019

Monday 20:00

Hall

The Lowy concert hall

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Hall

The Lowy concert hall

Artists

Zubin Mehta, conductor 

Khatia Buniatishvili, pianist 

Concert Program

Mozart: Overture to Don Giovanni (Busoni ending)
Schubert: Symphony no. 3
Mozart: Piano Concerto no. 20 in D minor, K. 466

Event Info

In its original version, the overture to the opera "Don Giovanni" flows directly into the beginning of the first act. Mozart, who had a developed commercial sense, also wrote thirteen final bars for the overture so that it could be performed as an independent work. In 1909, the composer and pianist Ferruccio Busoni composed his own ending to the overture. This is, in fact, one of a long series of "interpretations" that Busoni composed of works written before his time. Who was Ferruccio Busoni and what was his contribution to the history of music?

He was born in April 1866 in Empoli, Italy, and died in Berlin in 1924. He was one of the greatest virtuoso pianists of his time and worked in Austria and Germany. He was an interesting composer, a teacher, an aesthetic philosopher, and a subversive musical theorist. During his life and following his death, Busoni was best known as a pianist with astounding abilities and an important interpreter of Bach, Mozart, and Liszt. He was a staunch opponent of atonal innovation and the denial of the musical traditions by Schoenberg and his followers. He proposed a different aesthetic approach, revolutionary in its simplicity, and called it "Young Classicism."

He developed a special way of using the pedals of the piano, which enabled him to produce a type of legato that had not heard before and which became one of the hallmarks of his playing. He was one of the first virtuosos in the twentieth century to deeply study Mozart's piano concertos, and in general, his repertoire as a performer and arranger was unusual for his time. Like many virtuoso performers, Busoni also worked in composition, but unlike other composers, he saw himself as capable and even necessary to influence his surroundings and perhaps human culture in general as a thinker and intellectual. His motto "The music was born free and to win freedom is its destiny," together with his multilayered perception, enabled him to become well integrated into his various musical activities. "The absolute modern doesn’t exist, only that which has arisen earlier or later, blooming longer or wilting more quickly." Busoni, a man of the present who "updates" Bach, interprets Liszt, writes "anti-histories" of Mozart's concertos, tackles the myth of Dr. Faustus, and references extinct folk tunes and Gregorian music in his works. Busoni tried in his work to bridge time periods and musical styles, and in doing so, he reveals to his audience of listeners, readers, and students a full aesthetic and musical approach that is at once timeless, encompassing, and accessible to all.

During his lifetime, Schubert was not considered an important symphonic composer. History has also been somewhat cruel to his symphonies, and except for the "Unfinished," they were forgotten for a long time. His Symphony No. 3, for example, was only performed in a public concert for the first time 53 years after the composer's death, and it made its way very slowly to the edge of the recorded repertoire. An ad in the Maariv newspaper from 1971 says, for example, that the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra chose to include the work in a youth concert(!). We assume that some of our longtime subscribers still remember this concert years later, or perhaps they remember the performance of this symphony with the English Chamber Orchestra, which was conducted in Caesarea in the same year by Daniel Barenboim.

It seems everything has already been written about Mozart's Piano Concerto in D Minor. But it may be worth noting that the opening of the work took place in the Mehlgrube Casino in Vienna with the composer as soloist. It is one of only two concertos that Mozart wrote in a minor key (the second is the C Minor Concerto, K.491), and as a young pianist, Ludwig Van Beethoven included it in his repertoire, writing his own cadenzas for the first and second movements of the work in 1809.

Price Range

180-550 nis

Duration

approx 2 hours including intermission

Duration

approx 2 hours including intermission

Price range

180-550 nis

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