Kirill Petrenko and Yuja Wang

יוג'ה ואנג

Date

18.2.2018

Sunday 20:00

Hall

Ussishkin

Venue

International Convention Center (ICC) Jerusalem

Venue

International Convention Center (ICC) Jerusalem

Hall

Ussishkin

Artists

Kirill Petrenko, conductor 

Yuja Wang, pianist 

Concert Program

Dukas: La Péri

Prokofiev: Piano Concerto no. 3

Brahms: Symphony no. 1

Event Info

Of the few works French composer Paul Dukas left behind we tend to remember only “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice.” And we almost lost the music to the ballet “La Péri” because Dukas planned to use it to pay for a gambling debt. But friends persuaded him to safeguard this work, which he had composed for ballerina Natasha Trouhanova, and thus it was preserved. The subject of the work is immortality: a fairy guards the flower of immortality and Iskender sets out to find it. But, (as expected?) he fails.  The music is imbued with a magical atmosphere while Iskender’s attempts to steal the flower are bestowed with additional color.

Like Beethoven, Sergei Prokofiev composed five piano concertos and stopped composing in this genre when he ceased performing; and like Beethoven he went on to compose piano sonatas. Like Beethoven, Prokofiev always traveled with a notebook in hand in which he noted musical ideas he was afraid to lose. Like Beethoven, he sat down to compose his Piano Concerto No. 3 after he had already sketched out most of the work in his notebook. The result? Following the world premiere of the work, the Chicago Daily Herald wrote: “this was the most beautiful concerto of the modern world.” Prokofiev dedicated the concerto to the poet Konstantin Balmont who reacted to the tribute with a sonnet beginning with these words: “A joyful flame from a scarlet flower/ a keyboard of words shines in the flames / that suddenly leap in tongues of fire…” Beautiful, rousing words that move us just like the concerto.

“I will never compose a symphony! You have no idea what a composer goes through when he feels that the giant stature of Beethoven is watching him,” Brahms confided to Herman Levy, the famous conductor. Brahms, who had already composed sophisticated orchestral music with his “A German Requiem,” his first piano concerto and a number of chamber works, waited many years before completing Symphony No. 1. Today, we all hum the music from the 4th movement and love the entire symphony. It’s just as well that we have forgotten the complex reception that greeted the premiere of the work.

Price Range

130 - 430 nis

Duration

approx. 110 minutes including intermission

Duration

approx. 110 minutes including intermission

Price range

130 - 430 nis

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