Lahav Shani and Christian Tetzlaff

כריסטיאן טצלף

Date

24.1.2018

Wednesday 20:00

Hall

Lowy Concert Hall

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Hall

Lowy Concert Hall

Artists

Lahav Shani, conductor 

Christian Tetzlaff, violinist 

Yossi Arnheim, flutist 

Concert Program

Bach: Orchestral Suite no. 2

Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto

Beethoven: Symphony no. 7

Event Info

We are delighted to host the young Israeli conductor Lahav Shani, who returns once again after receiving enthusiastic reviews from Israeli audiences and critics alike. The wonderful violinist Christian Tetzlaff joins for two exciting programs.

When Bach served in a small principality, he was not required to compose religious or church music. There was no need for this in a small country. In contrast, secular instrumental music was in demand. Bach composed a series of important works that included Orchestral Suite no. 2, which accords a central role to the solo flute. Like his other suites, it symbolized European unity well before anyone put the idea in his head. France, Spain and Poland and their characteristic folk dances are represented in the different movements. The majority, in this case, are French dances. The last movement, Badinerie, a rousing, original movement helped make the suite one of the 100 most popular works of all time.
Yossi Arnheim's flute sound evokes nobility embedded in a refined classical tradition.

In terms of the concerto form, Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto was revolutionary in its time. It has no orchestral introduction. The solo violin presents the first theme on the high string, over subdued whispers by the orchestra.  From this point till the end of the work, there is a sense of partnership, rather than rivalry, between soloist and orchestra. The atmosphere is one of optimism in the spirit of the fairy music of Midsummer Night’s Dream. The soloist’s brilliance blends beautifully with the brilliance of the orchestra. An innovative partnership at the time and pure pleasure in our time.

The Viennese audience which heard Beethoven’s Symphony no. 7 at its world premiere demanded to hear the second movement again. An astonishing event for a Viennese audience which usually heard only extracts from new works. In his seventh symphony, Beethoven transformed the customary slow second movement into a fast movement. Composers who followed him described the symphony in dance terms: “An apotheosis of dance in which tables and benches, cans and cups, grandmothers, the blind, the lame and children in the cradle all fall to dancing” (Wagner), “a village wedding” (Schumann), “a peasant dance” (Berlioz).
Beethoven’s seventh is indeed a celebration of rhythm from beginning to end and it is no wonder that Beethoven himself said “As I composed the work, I felt like Bacchus pouring wine over mankind…”

 

Price Range

180-550 nis

Duration

approx 100 minutes including intermission

Duration

approx 100 minutes including intermission

Price range

180-550 nis

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