Manfred Honeck and Manuel Walser

מנפרד הונק

Date

15.3.2018

Thursday 20:00

Hall

Lowy Concert Hall

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Hall

Lowy Concert Hall

Artists

Manfred Honeck, conductor 

Manuel Walser, baritone 

Concert Program

Haydn: Symphony no. 100 (“Military”)

Bach: Cantata BWV 82, “Ich habe genug”

Mozart: Symphony no. 41, K. 551 (“Jupiter”)

Event Info

"The most important thing to me is the meaning behind the music, the story behind it." - Manfred Honeck

The IPO is delighted to host renowned Austrian conductor Manfred Honeck, Music Director of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, in a series of concerts with young  Swiss baritone Manuel Walser, student of Thomas Quasthoff.

In early 1794, the day after the premiere of Haydn's Symphony no. 100, the London Morning Chronicle published a review of the concert. The paper described the work: “It is the advancing to battle, and the march of men, the sounding of the charge, the thundering of the onset, the clash of arms, the groans of the wounded, and what may well be called the hellish roar of war increased to a climax of horrid sublimity.” This response sounds naïve today, but it was the result of the triangle, cymbals, bass drum, and trumpet, which Haydn added to the usual timpani. The "noise" apparently fascinated Haydn's English listeners at the time, and this symphony became known as the "Military." The Londoners were the first to hear the work, and through all the “noise,” the piece managed to speak to the hearts of its listeners—and it continues to do so today.

The Cantata BWV 82, “Ich habe genug” ("I have enough”), more literally means "I have lived enough," and it was one of Bach's favorites. He wrote several versions of the work for different voices, and in the last iteration, written shortly before his death, he added a role for oboe da caccia—an arch-shaped wooden wind instrument whose sound is lower than that of the oboe—to the work. Anna Magdalena, Bach's second wife, copied the music to her private notebook. The work speaks of a longing for death. It may seem strange, but in Bach’s time death was present in every house, and it was a wish that religious people expressed in lullabies. One Bach scholar theorized that the work was written around the time of the death of one of Bach's daughters, when she was only three years old. What is in fact known about the work, however, is that Bach composed the beautiful piece for an outstanding young bass, who sang it for the first time at the church of St. Thomas in Leipzig to mark the Feast of the Purification of Mary (Candlemas) on February 2, 1727.

The moniker "Jupiter" was given to Mozart’s Symphony No. 41 by an English publisher shortly before its debut in England. Mozart, who finished the composition in August 1788, three years before his death, never heard the work performed. Symphony No. 41 is considered a mature symphonic work; its four-movement structure has the feel of a polyphonic improvisation in the spirit of Bach, and makes use of the well-known Sonata-Allegro form. Mozart split the roles of the cellos and contrabasses in order to achieve a richer string ensemble sound—rather than the typical four-voice sound with the cellos and basses playing the same part, the contrabasses now have their own independent part, adding a fifth voice to the texture.

Price Range

180-550 nis

Duration

approx 100 minutes including intermission

Duration

approx 100 minutes including intermission

Price range

180-550 nis

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