Opening of the season with Zubin Mehta and pianist Martha Argerich

מרתה ארגריך

Date

04.10.2018

Thursday 20:00

Hall

Lowy Concert Hall

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Hall

Lowy Concert Hall

Artists

Zubin Mehta, conductor 

Martha Argerich, pianist 

Mojca Erdmann, soprano 

Julia Rutigliano, mezzo-soprano 

Bernhard Berchtold, tenor 

Wilhelm Schwinghammer, bass 

The Munich Bach Choir 

Concert Program

Uri Brener: The Prophet

Schumann: Piano Concerto

Mozart: Mass in Cmajor, K. 317, “Coronation Mass”

 

Event Info

A special meeting on the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra stage for the opening of the Eighty-Third Season

Maestro Zubin Mehta and the wonderful pianist Martha Argerich lead the opening concert of the new season, joined by a quartet of singers and the renowned Munich Bach Choir, to perform three works, each with a fascinating story: The program begins with "The Prophet," a symphonic poem by Israeli composer Uri Brenner. The source of the composer’s inspiration is the role of the artist through Alexander Pushkin’s eyes, described in the work with the sounds of the orchestra and voices of the choir: "... to inform people of the truth...to illuminate their path to a higher and more spiritual life."

Next, Martha Argerich performs Robert Schumann's Piano Concerto in A Minor. It took Schumann five years to write the concerto, and the composer designated it as a wedding gift for his wife, the pianist Clara Wieck. Their long struggle with their families for their right to marry made this magnificent concerto into one of the most romantic pieces in the history of music. The concerto expresses Schumann's vision of the role of the artist, as he wrote in 1839: "We must wait for a composer to show us a new and brilliant way of combining the piano sound with the orchestral sound, and for the pianist to display his art on the keyboard in a way that blends with the orchestra, which no longer looks on from outside but fits into the scene."

After the break, four soloists and the Munich Bach Choir join the orchestra to perform Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s "Coronation Mass" (K. 317). The young prodigy grew up to become a composer who needed to work for a living. He was appointed organist and composer in the cathedral in his hometown of Salzburg. As one of many composers in this role, Mozart is particularly brilliant in dealing with the traditional elements of the mass. He emphasizes the vocal presence of the singers and the marches in the trumpets, and creates music that would later be used in the coronation ceremonies of Austrian emperors - hence the name, “Coronation.”

Farewells and Beginnings on the Israel Philharmonic Stage

Maestro Zubin Mehta, the pianist Denis Matsuev, a renowned quartet of singers and the Munich Bach Choir open the season with a program of farewells and beginnings.

Concertino for String Instruments by composer Ödön Pártos opens the concert. Pártos, who was the orchestra's principal violist during its first two decades, colored the piece in shades that reflect the origins of his work: Hungarian folk music. One year after the premiere of the concertino, Pártos won the Israel Prize for Music for his work "Ein Gev," becoming the first composer to receive the prestigious prize.

Pianist Denis Matsuev plays Piano Concerto No. 3 by Ludwig van Beethoven. In this work, Beethoven continued in the tradition of his predecessor Mozart, but with added dramatic moments, an increased presence of percussion instruments and hints to his future works. As only Beethoven could, he did not finish the work in time for the premiere, and it’s unclear whether he played from the music or improvised his role as soloist. Years later, the work would be published, marking the beginning of a new era in the genre of the concerto.

After intermission, four soloists and the Munich Bach Choir join the orchestra for a performance of the “Coronation Mass” (K. 317) composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart at the invitation of the Archbishop of Salzburg. This is a milestone work in the maturation of the composer's artistic path, a sensational leap - from a genius boy and young man to a "professional" composer who knows how to create, innovate and surprise even within the framework of his occupational and religious constraints. In the Mass both the choir and wind instruments are prominent, and later the work was performed at the coronation ceremonies of the Austrian emperors - hence the name "Coronation."

The Goethe-Institut Israel is honoured to facilitate ten concerts of the Munich Bach Choir as guests of the Israeli Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Maestro Zubin Mehta. We congratulate the State of Israel on 70 years of independence and look forward to many more years of fruitful cultural cooperations between Germany and Israel.

Price Range

180-550 nis

Duration

approx 2 hours including intermission

Duration

approx 2 hours including intermission

Price range

180-550 nis

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