The Opening of the Season with Maestro Mehta and Maria João Pires

מריה ז'ואאו פירז'

Date

22.10.2017

Sunday 20:00

Hall

Lowy Concert Hall

Venue

Charles R. Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Venue

Charles R. Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Hall

Lowy Concert Hall

Artists

Zubin Mehta, conductor 

Maria João Pires, pianist 

Concert Program

Weber: Oberon Overture

Mozart: Symphony no. 36, K. 425 (“Linz”)

Beethoven: Piano Concerto no. 3

 

Event Info

The selection of works for the opening series of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra’s 82nd season reflects an out-of-the-box approach both compositionally and artistically.

Weber composed the opera “Oberon” in 1826 for London’s Covent Garden Opera House. The plot resembles “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” but the work is based on a poem by German poet Christoph Martin Wieland. From the first notes of the overture, Weber beautifully evokes the elves and fairies that abound in the forest. The London audience was thrilled with the work and demanded the orchestra return on stage to play the overture again. Veterans of the Palestine Symphony Orchestra (now the IPO) remember well the blast of Horst Salomon’s horn in the overture.

Mozart and his wife arrived in Linz on their way to Vienna after visiting his father in Salzburg. They were invited to stay at the home of a local count who immediately announced an orchestral concert. “I didn’t have all my notes with me” Mozart wrote to his father. But, in less than four days, Mozart composed one of the most beautiful and innovative symphonies, Symphony No. 36 known as the Linz Symphony. The slow introduction to the first movement was a major innovation in those days. Does any member of the audience know that the notes were transcribed just a few minutes before the performance?  It is doubtful.

The first performance of Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3 was one he would not forget. The best musicians in Vienna were playing in another concert and Beethoven was forced to assemble an orchestra from the remaining musicians in town.  With insufficient funds to finance a meal, one of his friends paid for cold meat and wine for all the musicians out of his own pocket. And what about the score? The copyist had not managed to finish transcribing the work so Beethoven played the solo part from a blank score whose pages he turned just for form. But with this performance, however, Beethoven broke new ground for he completely re-invented the piano concerto form.

Outwardly, Beethoven seemed to be looking to Mozart, his famed predecessor, and his concerto No. 24. But with this concerto, he also parted from the tradition of Haydn and Mozart in important, new ways. His innovations can be heard in the tone-color of the orchestral instruments and in the balance between soloist and orchestra. His changes were not overly dramatic; it was an evolutionary rather than a revolutionary process. But it was clear from the very first performance that the piano concerto had changed definitively and forever.

Maria João Pires, who performs this concerto, is one of the most refined, sensitive pianists of our time and an artist who has initiated numerous innovative projects. Pires opened a center in Portugal where artists can connect with one another, and she started choral projects for children with disabilities in several places across Europe. She firmly believes that music should not solely be the domain of a concert hall but should also have a social function, and her actions support these beliefs.

 

Price Range

180-550 nis

Duration

approx 75 minutes including intermission

Duration

approx 75 minutes including intermission

Price range

180-550 nis

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