Yoel Levi Conducts Bruckner’s 4th

יואל לוי

Date

13.5.2018

Sunday 20:00

Hall

Lowy Concert Hall

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Venue

Charles Bronfman Auditorium, Tel Aviv

Hall

Lowy Concert Hall

Artists

Yoel Levi, conductor 

Christian Lindberg, trombonist 

Concert Program

Bach: Brandenburg Concerto no. 3

Berio: SOLO for Trombone and Orchestra

Bruckner: Symphony no. 4

Event Info

The orchestra is excited to host conductor Yoel Levi again and trombonist Christian Lindberg.

Bach's Brandenburg Concertos were discovered by chance in the library of the nobleman Brandenburg, who commissioned the works but did not even bother to carry them out. The loss, it must be said, is his. In each of the six concertos, Bach reveals new qualities as a highly capable orchestrator. All six are masterpieces. The third Brandenburg concerto gives up a single solo instrument in favor of 3 violins, 3 violas, 3 cellos, bass and harpsichord. Bach remains faithful to the Concerto Grosso tradition, writing for a group of solo instruments with orchestral accompaniment. The big surprise is the second movement, which includes only two chords. Is it based on the ability of the harpsichord player to improvise? Each performance brings a unique solution.

In his work  "Solo" for trombone and orchestra, composer Luciano Berio offers a new approach to the concerto. It seemingly eliminates the interdependence between soloist and orchestra, which are now independent entities. Therefore, the music of these two components of the work exists simultaneously, but without regard for one another. Sometimes they share a pitch of sound, for example, or a single element, but it is not a dialogue in the tradition of Western music. He composed the piece in Rio for trombonist Christian Lindberg, after they met when Lindberg was performing as a soloist in the opera A Place, A History, and Berio was composing in Rio during this time, at the end of the last century.
What a treat to hear the piece by the soloist for whom it was written!

"If one wishes to envision the essence of Bruckner's artistry and life, one should listen to his Romantic Symphony. Village and school, forest and church - all are in this work, sounding and living before our eyes. Bruckner is revealed to us great and hearty". (From an article in Fremden Blatt, Vienna, 1896).

Bruckner himself entitled this symphony "Romantic" and this is his only symphony that has a title. However, Symphony No. 4 should not be attributed to the Romantic stream of the period in which it was composed. On the whole, Bruckner's music is not a continuation of the music of the major Romantic composers of the first half of the 19th century. Until his late thirties Bruckner was not acquainted with the works of Mendelssohn, Schumann or Wagner, since he lived in relative seclusion in small towns near Linz in upper Austria. The roots of Bruckner's music can be found mainly in Classical, Baroque and Renaissance church music.
The Fourth Symphony is the first of four symphonies (nos. 4-7) written in a major key, following Bruckner's previous symphonies and masses which were all in  minor keys. The reason for this surprising fact may be Bruckner's improved financial situation and growing self-confidence as a composer. The major-key tonality that appears for the first time at the beginning of the Romantic Symphony gives a feeling of optimism, openness and freedom of all the tension that characterised Bruckner's earlier symphonies.

Price Range

180-550 nis

Duration

approx. 120 minutes including intermission

Duration

approx. 120 minutes including intermission

Price range

180-550 nis

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