Lahav Shani and Christian Tetzlaff

להב שני

Date

22.1.2018

Monday 20:00

Hall

Auditorium

Venue

Rappaport Hall, Haifa

Venue

Rappaport Hall, Haifa

Hall

Auditorium

Artists

Lahav Shani, conductor 

Christian Tetzlaff, violinist 

Yossi Arnheim, flutist 

Concert Program

Bach: Orchestral Suite no. 2

Bartók: Violin Concerto no. 2

Shostakovich: Symphony no. 5

Event Info

We are delighted to host the young Israeli conductor Lahav Shani, who returns once again after receiving enthusiastic reviews from Israeli audiences and critics alike. The wonderful violinist Christian Tetzlaff joins for two exciting programs.

When Bach served in a small principality he was not required to compose religious
or church music, and secular instrumental music was in demand. Bach composed a series of important works that included Orchestral Suite no. 2, which gives a central role to the solo flute. Like his other suites, it symbolized European unity well before anyone put the idea in his head. Characteristic folk dances from France, Spain and Poland are all represented in this suite; the majority are French dances. The rousing last movement, Badinerie, helped make the suite one of the 100 most popular works of all time.
Yossi Arnheim's flute sound evokes nobility embedded in a refined classical tradition.

When violinist Zoltán Székely asked Bela Bartók to compose a violin concerto for him, the request came at exactly the right time. Bartók had just finished a period of research into folk music and was looking for an outlet for his findings: “The ideal process of integration,” said Bartók, “ is to feel that this peasant music has become so much a part of you that you do not feel you are using it but rather that it is your mother tongue.”  In his Violin Concerto Bartók leans on themes derived from folk music while adding various variations. Székely was pleased when he saw the score but was upset by one thing: the last twenty-two notes were devoted to the orchestra while the soloist remained silent. After some debate, Bartók agreed to shorten the work on condition that two versions appeared in the score, allowing violinists and conductors to choose their preferred version. We shall see what the IPO will play.

Shostakovich’s Symphony no. 5 was written as a response to the threat Stalin had leveled at the composer. It was an astute response and, already at its premiere 80 years ago, in 1937, the Russian audience understood the hidden message in the notes. Shostakovich composed the work a year after having been subjected to stinging criticism by the political establishment headed by Stalin. After almost two years of imposed silence, he composed the new work and described it as “a Soviet artist’s response to justified criticism.” We do not know if he truly intended such a headline or if he was simply complying with the orders of party officials. Symphony No. 5 is considered to be one of his best symphonies and is certainly his most popular. It is a large, direct, sentimental, and courageous work.

 

Price Range

130 - 430 nis

Duration

approx. 120 minutes including intermission

Duration

approx. 120 minutes including intermission

Price range

130 - 430 nis

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